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Friday, August 7, 2020 | History

3 edition of The relative sensitivity of seabird populations in Alaska to oil pollution found in the catalog.

The relative sensitivity of seabird populations in Alaska to oil pollution

The relative sensitivity of seabird populations in Alaska to oil pollution

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  • 40 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, Alaska Outer Continental Shelf Office in Anchorage, Alaska .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Sea birds -- Effect of oil spills on -- Alaska.,
  • Petroleum -- Physiological effect.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementDonald J. Hansen.
    SeriesTechnical paper / U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, Alaska Outer Continental Shelf Office -- no. 3., Technical paper (Alaska Outer Continental Shelf Office) -- no. 3.
    ContributionsAlaska Outer Continental Shelf Office.
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Paginationiv, 5, [13] p.
    Number of Pages13
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15268190M

      A study conducted by students and researchers from the Sea Around Us project found that the world's monitored seabird populations have fallen nearly 70 percent since the s. That marks a . Current threats to seabird populations in the Gulf of the Farallones region include effects of contaminants from San Francisco Bay, overfishing, low-level or “chronic” oil pollution, and mortality associated with gillnetting in Monterey Bay. Declines in some seabird populations in the gulf are occurring because of these and other effects.

      (Learn more about marine pollution.) diving bird that lives in the Northern Pacific near Alaska, A recent study found a 67 percent decline in seabird populations between and The Arctic region is characterized by some of the largest continuous intact ecosystems on the planet, but is facing increasingly larger threats. These threats include the full range of stressors.

    An oil spill is the release of a liquid petroleum hydrocarbon into the environment, especially the marine ecosystem, due to human activity, and is a form of term is usually given to marine oil spills, where oil is released into the ocean or coastal waters, but spills may also occur on spills may be due to releases of crude oil from tankers, offshore platforms, drilling. The study updated previous work on seabird sensitivity to wind farms in Scottish waters to include more recent demographic data and defining populations relevant to English territorial waters. This enables comparison to be made of relative species sensitivity in English and Scottish by:


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The relative sensitivity of seabird populations in Alaska to oil pollution Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. The relative sensitivity of seabird populations in Alaska to oil pollution. [Donald J Hansen; Alaska Outer Continental Shelf Office.] -- Consolidates information on the potential effects of oil pollution on marine and coastal birds from oil and gas lease sales pending for the outer continental shelf areas of Alaska.

Alaska's Vast Seabird Population. About 50 million seabirds nest on Alaska's coast each summer. This is 87% of all the seabirds in the United States. (Hawaii has the second most seabirds of any state.) Alaska's seabirds nest in more than seabird colonies around the coast. Alaska has many seabirds for several reasons.

Seabirds are the most visible and vulnerable victims of oil pollution in marine waters. As demonstrated by the "Exxon Valdez" spill (Piatt et al. ), we cannot predict when or where an accident leading to pollution might occur in Alaska, or where oil will eventually end up traveling from a point source of pollution.

It is therefore prudent to document the abundance and distribution of Author: John F. Piatt, R. Glenn Ford. The Effects of Chronic Oil Pollution on Seabird Populations. Recent Adv Petrochem Sci. ; 2(1): DOI: /RAPSCI Recent dvances in etrochemical Science Figure 1: Extent to which oil affect seabirds [8].

Investigating the method by Camphuysen, applied a similar scoring system to that of King & Sanger () to File Size: KB. Alaska (see Byrd and DragooByrd et al. andDragoo et al.,and for compilations of previous years’ data).

The seabird monitoring program in Alaska. LIST OF TABLES Table & Population plot strata used for calculating population parameters 14 at St. George Island, Alaska.

Black-legged kittiwake populations on common census plots at St. 14 George Island in Estimates of the number of murres and kittiwakes on population plots 24 at St. George Island, Alaska, Nesting chronology of kittiwakes and murres at St. Title: Oil Pollution and Seabird Populations: Discussion: Authors: Crisp, D.

J.; Dunnet, G. M.; Conan, G.; Bourne, W. Publication: Philosophical Transactions of. "Compilation of seabird species accounts for all seabirds breeding in Alaska and five important nonbreeders. Conservation status, life history, distribution, population size and trends, conservation concerns, and recommended management actions are included in the accounts"--Leaf i.

For the study, the researchers compiled information on more than seabird populations from around the world, representing 19 percent of the global seabird population. - never a "normal" year to serve as a baseline for comparison of seabird growth, survival, and population dynamics - Seabirds are adapted to survive in highly stochastic environments •Difficult to tease apart cause and effect relationships between weather events and seabird life-history traits.

IMPACT OF OIL POLLUTION ON SEABIRD POPULATIONS What matters in the long-term is the effect of pollutants on the population and the community (ICES, ; GESAMP, ), and the significance of the mortality of seabirds from oil pollution or other causes depends on the population dynamics of the species in question and the role of that species Cited by: In turn, long-term effects of major oil spill events and chronic oil pollution are discussed as potential reasons for declines in bird populations (Votier et al., ).

These authors found that winter mortality of adult guillemots was doubled by major oil pollution incidents in combination with effects of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). Large numbers of seabirds may be killed from time to time by individual incidents of oil pollution, and throughout the year, especially in winter, dead seabirds, many of them oiled, are washed up o.

About million seabirds reside in marine waters of Alaska during some part of the year. Perhaps half this population is composed of 50 species of nonbreeding residents, visitors, and breeding species that use marine habitats only seasonally (Gould et al.

Another 30 species include million individuals that breed in Alaska and spend most of their lives in U.S. territorial waters. Chapter Seabirds. Contributors: Ben Lascelles (Convenor), Jake Rice (Lead Member and Editor of Part VI), Mayumi Sato, Marguerite Tarzia, Ross McLeod Wanless.

Introduction Seabirds are File Size: KB. Chemical analyses of the oils on dead or moribund seabirds from Atlantic Canada during the winter of – indicated that some of the birds were contaminated with oil spilled by the Argo Merchant grounding, some by oil probably from the Grand Zenith sinking, and still others by oil from various small local spills of unknown origin.

These victims demonstrated that an extremely minute Cited by: The Seabird Oil Sensitivity Index (SOSI) update data developed by HiDef and for a Steering Group facilitated by Oil & Gas UK is provided by Oil & Gas UK in good faith to JNCC, but Oil & Gas UK accepts no responsibility for any damage or losses that may arise from use of this SOSI dataset.

Oil spills often spell disaster for marine birds caught in slicks. However, the impact of oil pollution on seabird population parameters is poorly known because oil spills usually occur in wintering areas remote from breeding colonies where birds may be distributed over a wide area, and because it is difficult to separate the effects of oil pollution from the effect of natural environmental Cited by: Beginning inlarge numbers of dead seabirds have been appearing on beaches in most marine areas of Alaska.

Although seabird die-offs are known to occur sporadically (e.g.,/, and ) in Alaska, these recent die-offs have been distinguished from past events by their increased frequency, duration, geographic extent, and number of different species involved.

Assessing the Vulnerability of Seabirds to Oil Pollution: Sensitivity to Spatial Scale G. BEGG, J. REID, M. TASKER AND A. WEBB Joint Nature Conservation Committee, Dunnet House, 7 Thistle Place, Aberdeen, AB10 1UZ, Scotland.

Seabirds – Introduction Alaska’s productive seas and isolated islands provide habitat for one of the largest and • Oil pollution, including chronic oiling (maybe bilge dumping) Maintain Alaska-wide populations at least at levels existing in year The two most promising advances in seabird management and research in the next decade or so are likely to involve large-scale cooperative projects to identify and protect critical breeding islands and foraging sites at sea, and the use of scientifically-sound models designed for management of populations of by: 2.Inthe Alaska Regional Response Team (RRT) recognized that guidance for dealing with oiled wildlife was not specifically provided in either the National Oil and Hazardous Substance Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) or the Alaska Region Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (Alaska Region Contingency Plan).File Size: 3MB.